Stacked

You know what this means don’t you?

stack(Well yes, yes it does mean my entire front yard is covered in a foot of snow and is a featureless, frigid whiteout of despair…but that’s not exactly what I had in mind…look at the yarn instead of the background.)  It means it’s almost photo shoot time.

The next photo shoot is in early April, and these are all the yarns I’ve used in it.  Running top to bottom we’ve got Bare Naked Wools, Vice, Quince, SweetGeorgia, Frog Tree, Phydeaux, Elemental Effects, Alchemy, Blue Moon Fiber Arts, Manos, Uncommon Thread, Lorna’s Laces, Anzula, Shibui, and Mrs. Crosby.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I have some projects to block.  I think this one is going to be a ridiculous amount of fun.  Which one are you most curious to see more of?

Book Yarn, Part IX

KCC3 is debuting soon (next week, eep!) and I want to take a bit of time during the lead up to show off all the delightful yarns I’ve used in the book. So without further ado, yarn.

9These cheerful offerings are from SweetGeorgia.  SweetGeorgia does amazing colors.  Rich, saturated, intense colors.  The colors that bolder, braver people than I manage to use in their houses and I always think it looks fabulous and am secretly jealous.  And while I can’t pull it off in my house, thanks to SweetGeorgia, I can totally manage it in my stash!  And I’ve been loving it for a while now.  I used it for my Sock Report socks, for socks and a hat in KCC1, and for socks way back in the very first book.

On the left, you’ve got BFL Sock in Pistachio.  This is an 80% blue-faced leicester, 20% nylon blend, and it makes smashing socks.  BFL totally has that sturdy, slightly crunchy, properly woolly feel that I like in socks.  I don’t know how to say it other than that it feels knitterly in the best possible way.  And yes, yes that totally is the yarn I used for the socks on the front cover.

On the right, you’ve got Merino Silk Aran in China Doll.  This is a 50% merino, 50% silk mix, and I’m smitten with it.  It’s got 8 plys, and they’re twisted up into 4 pairs, which are then all twisted up with each other.  The result is super bouncy, without being heavy at all.  It’s absolutely delightful!

And that brings us to the end of the book yarns (if you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll can all be found over here)!  Which suggests it’s just about time for the book itself, don’t you think?  Details of the preorder will all be going up on Monday, and the preorder itself will open Tuesday.  I can’t wait for you to see it!

 

Book Yarn, Part VIII

KCC3 is debuting soon (this month, eep!) and I want to take a bit of time during the lead up to show off all the delightful yarns I’ve used in the book.  So without further ado, yarn.

8This lovely burst of sunshine is from the good folks at Malabrigo.  I’m guessing most of you already know all about Malabrigo (it’s that one you find yourself hopelessly drawn to when you walk into your favorite yarn shop).  And I’m guessing I love it just about as much as you do.  It’s turned a pair of fetching hats in Ne’er-Do-Well Knits, a sock and mitt in KCC2, a mitt and cowl in Rabble Rousers, and even the very first hat I ever knit.  Their yarns and colors are always delightful.

On the left, you’ve got Arroyo in English Rose.  Now I know the info page technically lists this yarn as a sport weight.  But I really, firmly, vigorously believe that can play the part of a fingering weight yarn in disguise.  It knits up into a beautiful sock fabric at 8-8.5 stitches per inch (and it’s loosely plied and airy enough that you want to knit it that firmly if you’re going to make socks out of it.  Which you totally should do.  Because wow do they look nifty!

On the right, you’ve got Rios in Sunset.  Rios is another marvelously flexible choice.  It’s a lovely, bouncy, 100% merino, worsted weight yarn.  And like Arroyo, you can knit it at the recommended gauge for a soft drapey fabric, or pack it in a bit tighter for a sturdier project.  I may have indisputable proof that it can turn into an absolutely adorable hat!

If you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll show up here as they are posted.

Book Yarn, Part VII

KCC3 is debuting soon (this month, eep!) and I want to take a bit of time during the lead up to show off all the delightful yarns I’ve used in the book.  So without further ado, yarn.

7These charming bits of yarn are from Dream in Color.  Dream in Color, not surprisingly, does amazing colors.  I swear I’ve not seen a shade I don’t like.  So as you might expect, it finds its way onto my needles often.  There are last year’s knitty socks, two other individual socks, a hat, and some socks from the first book.  And well, I might possibly have my eye on one of their new yarns for an upcoming project too.

On the left, you’ve got Everlasting Sock in Bitter.  Everlasting Sock (and its big brother Everlasting DK) is one of my favorite sock yarns.  Sock has eight tiny plies, and DK has 12.  They’re 100% merino, which would normally give me pause in a sock yarn, but the tiny plies are so tightly twisted I’ve never had any problem with them wearing out.  The Sock is a classic fingering weight, and the DK makes delightful thick socks.  And both show off fancy stitch work perfectly.

On the right, you’ve got Smooshy in Pansy Golightly.  Smooshy is another 100% merino, fingering weight yarn, but it is quite different than the Everlasting.  With three plies, it’s quite a bit sproingier (yes, that is so a word).  And you can see each ply (and the shadow it casts) much more clearly (you can see that in the picture), which gives a different texture to your knitted fabric than the smoother strand of Everlasting.  It totally works for socks, but here I’ve made it into an absolutely adorable mitt that I think you’ll love.

If you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll show up here as they are posted.

Book Yarn, Part VI

KCC3 is debuting soon (this month, eep!) and I want to take a bit of time during the lead up to show off all the delightful yarns I’ve used in the book.  So without further ado, yarn.

6These beauties are from Lorna’s Laces.  I adore Lorna’s Laces’ colors, and they’ve got a base that will work for pretty much any project you might have in mind.  So it’s no surprise that their yarn has found its way onto my needles before!  It’s been delightful in socks and a cowl from KCC2, and more lovely socks from the first book.  And there just may be some more of it on the way for future book projects as well!

On the left, you’ve got Shepherd Sock in Satusuma.  This is an 80% merino, 20% nylon mix and is delightfully round and sturdy.  It is that classic sock weight (meaning I look at it and go a bit weak in the knees at the thought of tiny stitches, but holy smokes does it make for a pretty sock if you’re braver than me).  The socks with this just may be on the back cover and I might possibly be unreasonably smitten with them.

On the right, you’ve got Pearl in The Bean.  This is a 51% silk, 49% bamboo mix, and slinky is the first word that comes to mind.  It’s shimmery and drapey and feels cool in your fingers as you work.  It’s also the yarn that got me over my fear of bamboo (I used a bamboo yarn years ago and it didn’t go well, but I should have known Lorna’s Laces would make one so nice it totally made up for that).  It may possibly have turned into the cutest slouchy hat ever!

If you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll show up here as they are posted.

Book Yarn, Part V

KCC3 is debuting soon (next month!) and I want to take a bit of time during the lead up to show off all the delightful yarns I’ve used in the book.  So without further ado, yarn.

5These charming bits of fluffy goodness are from Shibui.  Shibui does something awfully nifty.  They have a range of fabulous yarn bases, and a set of lovely colors, and the colors carry over from base to base.  That means if you want to combine yarns in a single project, you can do it with confidence.  It’s really rather magical.  It’s actually something I’m playing with for a project down the road, but that must remain a secret for a while yet.  However, I do have a few non-secret Shibui projects, to show my love, including a hat and socks from KCC2, and some socks from the very first book.  Apparently when I find something I like, I stick with it!

On the left, you’ve got Staccato in Raspberry.  This is a 70% merino, 30% silk blend that makes delightful socks.  The silk is every bit as sturdy a reinforcement as nylon would be (so your socks will hold up well), but rather more luxurious.  And it gives the yarn a lovely sheen.

On the right, you’ve got Silk Cloud in Ash.  This is a fluffy bit of confectionery.  It’s 60% mohair, 40% silk, and wispy doesn’t even begin to cover it.  I think the project I made with this weighed in at something like 17 grams.  And yet, because the mohair traps so much air, it’s actually amazingly warm.  I can’t wait to show you the project for these, every time I show someone the book in person, it’s the one that people go most nuts over.

If you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll show up here as they are posted.

Book Yarn, Part IV

KCC3 is debuting soon (next month!) and I want to take a bit of time during the lead up to show off all the delightful yarns I’ve used in the book.  So without further ado, yarn.

4These lovely bits of goodness are from Blue Moon Fiber Arts.  Have I mentioned how one of the coolest things about doing these books is getting to use yarns I love?  So it should come as no surprise that Blue Moon has found its way onto my needles before.  There were the socks and shawl in the first KCC book, some socks in my very first book, and some even earlier socks.  I’ve apparently been smitten for a long time!

On the left, you’ve got Socks That Rock Mediumweight in Saffron Surprise.  STR mediumweight has been one of my favorite fat sock yarns for pretty much forever.  It’s 100% superwash merino, super round (the tightly twisted 3-ply structure helps with that) and bouncy, and has the density you want in something subjected to the abuse a sock yarn sees.  Plus, it comes in 6oz/400 yard skeins (so many of the yarns I like for thicker socks need two skeins to do a pair of socks) and all of Blue Moon’s amazing colors.  You really can’t go wrong.

On the right, you’ve got Marine Silk Sport in Spores.  This is a very interesting yarn.  It’s 51% silk, 29% merino, and 20% sea cell (which seems to be seaweed turned into rayon).  It’s drapey and slinky and shimmery and really quite fun to work with.  I’ve not seen anything quite like it, and it was great fun to play with!

If you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll show up here as they are posted.

Book Yarn, Part III

KCC3 is debuting soon (next month!) and I want to take a bit of time during the lead up to show off all the delightful yarns I’ve used in the book.  So without further ado, yarn.

3These beautiful yarns are from String Theory.  I may just have a little String Theory addiction problem obsession.  I’ve visited (twice).  My last two socks were made with String Theory.  Um, and the socks on the cover of Ne’er-Do-Well Knits.  Oh yeah, and some socks and a hat from KCC2.  Oh and there may well be another secret project I can’t tell you about yet.  Or possibly two of those.  So basically, they can do no wrong, and I love everything they do.

On the left, you’ve got Bluestocking in Mead.  It’s 80% Bluecaced Leicester and 20% nylon, giving you a sock that’s sturdy and slinky and all around smashing.  I’ve got it worked up into a pair of lovely socks (you’ll be seeing a lot of these socks in a week or two if all goes according to plan actually…), but it would work just as well mitts (the structure and composition would mean it won’t pill easily) or marvelously drapey shawls.

On the right, you’ve got Caper Aran in Shale.  This is the 80% merino, 10% cashmere, 10% nylon blend that so many of us have grown to love for socks, all grown up into an aran weight yarn.  This has become my number one go-to fat sock yarn.  The materials and structure make it durable, String Theory’s ridiculous skill with the dye pot makes it beautiful, and its lovely size makes for the smooshiest, quickest socks you could ask for.  That said, I know you’re not all fans of fat sock yarns, so in the book, this has turned into a beautiful shawl.  You’re going to love it, I can’t wait to show it off!

If you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll show up here as they are posted.

Book Yarn, Part II

KCC3 is debuting soon (next month!) and I want to take a bit of time during the lead up to show off all the delightful yarns I’ve used in the book.  So without further ado, yarn.

2These are two of the many amazing yarns available from Plucky Knitter.  My love affair with Plucky yarns is well-documented and long-lasting.  So far, I’ve indulged in some delightful boy socks, some downright girly socks, a cuff, a hat, and of course the cover socks from the last book!

On the left, you’ve got Plucky Feet in Spice of Life.  This is one of my absolute favorite sock yarns.  It’s 90% merino, 10% nylon, and 100% awesome.  The 4 tiny plies make it super round and ensure it shows off your stitches beautifully.  It also soaks up color and wears like iron.  I love everything about it.

On the right, you’ve got Plucky Single in Joe Banks.  This yarn, 80% merino and 20% silk, was new to me, but I’m already looking forward to using it again.  Like any single, it asks for a tiny bit of care and attention (you don’t generally want to use a single somewhere that will see a lot of rough wear), but it rewards that care beautifully.  I may just possibly have a shawl around here that demonstrates this perfectly!

If you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll show up here as they are posted.

 

Book Yarn, Part I

Someone very graciously pointed out to me I’ve been remiss in telling you about the yarns I used in the upcoming KCC3.  This is a situation I need to remedy as soon as possible, especially since we’re only about a month out from the book’s debut!  So, without further delay, book yarns.

1These delightful specimens are from the lovely folks at Quince & Co.  I first fell in love with Quince & Co yarns when we went to Maine in 2012.  I’d seen it online before that, but it was extra delightful in person.  I knew I wanted to work with it in the next book.

On the left, you’ve got Finch in Carrie’s Yellow.  It’s an absolutely smashing sock yarn.  Four, tightly-twisted plies make the yarn springy and give it excellent stitch definition.  And the 100% wool base makes it just the tiniest bit crisp.  Not scratchy at all, but just assertive enough that you know it will stand up to the things we ask of socks.

On the right, you’ve got Lark in Split Pea.  It’s another 4-ply yarn, but much softer and loftier than Finch.  If Finch is crisp, Lark is pillowy.  You could use it for a huge range of things, but I may just possibly have used mine for the most adorable hat ever.  It’s perfectly suited to the task!

There is more book yarn to come (9 pairs all together) and I’ll be going through them all over the next few weeks as I get ready for the book’s big release!  If you’re looking for the other yarns used in this book they’ll show up here as they are posted.