Loot

A bit of careful planning (taking into account geography, lunch plans, your recommendations, and other scheduled events) led to the conclusion that there was time to visit two yarn stores.   I knew I wanted to revisit Romni.  I’d been there back in 2007 when I was a very new knitter, and to be frank I’d found the whole thing more than a little overwhelming.  I wanted to go back and see if it felt different now that I had a bit better grounding.  I had been to Lettuce Knit before, but hadn’t visited Purple Purl, so I decided I’d try something new and make that the second one.

We started at Romni.  Well no, we started at breakfast so as to be properly fortified for our journeys.  Then we went to Romni.  I splurged on rather a lot of Fleece Artist / Hand Maiden.  I justify it by saying it’s Canadian…so it’s fitting to get in Toronto, right?  I got three skeins of Fleece Artist Woolie Twist (they’re the ones with the handwritten tags), and one of Hand Maiden Silk Twist.  Neither of these were bases I’d seen in stores around here, and both companies have color that is so variable from skein to skein that I try to only buy their yarn when I can actually see what I’m getting.  So it seemed like a great chance to pick up a bit of something new.

Over at Purple Purl, I fell prey to the charms of two skeins of Tanis Fiber Arts DK weight (it’s actually a bit greener than it looks there…not sure what’s up with that) and one skein of Malabrigo Arroyo.  It totally stunned me, but I actually bought it in a fairly pink sort of color.  I normally make funny faces at pink, but this one was singing my name, so I gave in.  We’ll see if the appeal lasts, but for now I’m smitten.

Oh, and as further proof of the fibery nature of the town, I grabbed a shot of this wee sculpture as we wondered around.  If the internet is to be believed, it’s called Uniform Measure/Stack and was created by Stephen Cruise in 1997.  That’s a stack of buttons, topped by a thimble.  In case it’s obscured by the snow, on the ground around it is a giant yellow tape measure.  There were, alas, no knitting needles, but it still gets high points for textile awareness.