Improvise

I used to think sock blockers were totally unnecessary, not much more than props really, something to make it look like you know what you’re doing.  They don’t make your socks any warmer or softer or sturdier.  Some people swear they help socks dry a bit faster.  However, I try to wash at least a dozen pairs at once, and I’m not likely to buy a dozen pairs of blockers, so they’re not much help in that regard either.

It wasn’t until I started taking pictures of socks that I realized what they’re for.  They’re for persuading your stitches to sit just right so you can get a pretty picture.  Blocked socks just look tidier.  I’m a believer.  It’s not worth it for day-to-day wear, but it is if you want to show off.

adumbrate_dryingIt seems only logical that the same would be true of other knitted things, so I wanted to block my mitts.  Alas, I don’t currently have any glove blockers.  The things exist, though not in such profusion as sock blockers.  There don’t seem to be a lot of modern versions, but there are quite a few older models on ebay and the like.  I find the vintage wooden glove forms oddly appealing (though I fear they wouldn’t be of much practical use since they seem to have been designed for people with tiny dainty hands and I just don’t do dainty).

Not having proper blockers, I decided to rig something up myself.  I hung the wet mitts from one set of needles, threaded another set through the bottom to hold them straight, added a few clips for a bit of weight, and worked the needles under a heavy box.  It seems to have worked, though it lacked something in the ambiance department.

When the snow lets up I’ll try to sneak outside and get some pictures.  I think I’ll likely put these out for free as first anniversary present.  Look for them early next month.